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Dog Skin Allergy, Prevention and Treatment

Large breed dogs as well as smaller breed dogs are susceptible to allergies. Amongst the most frequent allergies your dog can have are, dog food allergies and dog skin allergies. In both cases, your dog will constantly be scratching himself. For many dog owners it is very distressing to see their pet scratching all the time. When you see this happening, the first thing you must do is try to determine the cause of the scratching.

Large breed dogs as well as smaller breed dogs are susceptible to allergies. Amongst the most frequent allergies your dog can have are, dog food allergies and dog skin allergies. In both cases, your dog will constantly be scratching himself. For many dog owners it is very distressing to see their pet scratching all the time. When you see this happening, the first thing you must do is try to determine the cause of the scratching.

The pet might not have a dog skin allergy but a leech, tick, or some other kind of parasite might upset him. There is a possibility that the pet has a dog food allergy or he is anxious or worried about something and can’t find a better way to let the owner know about it. When you determine the cause of the scratching there are a number of treatments that you can apply in order to treat your pets problem and help him deal with the allergy.

Which Dog Skin Allergy does your pet have?

Since a dog skin allergy has multiple causes, there are chances that it manifests in different ways depending from case to case. The atopic dermatitis or atopy seems to be one of the most frequent skin allergies a dog can get. The sources of this allergy are the potentially allergic substances like pollen, dirt, mold or dust mites. These substances are particularly dangerous for dogs with a weak immune system. The first signs that your dog can develop atopy are its unnecessary focus on the paws, stomach and hind area. Atopy can appear early in your dog’s life.

Fleas or similar parasites can make your dog have a skin allergy. The little parasite’s presence is not as disturbing for your dog as their saliva that produces allergic reactions on your dog’s coat. If you notice that your dog is allergic to the fleas’ saliva, then you should act accordingly and promptly treat the problem thus eliminating your dog’s distress as well as treating the skin allergy.

Some dogs might contract a dog skin allergy by getting in contact with different types of plants or unpleasant substances. However, this dog skin allergy is not as widespread as the atopic dermatitis or the allergy produced by fleas, and it is usually easier to cure. The skin allergy that develops by contact with grass, flea collars, pet sheets, chemicals or some kinds of plants or even plastic is called Contact dermatitis. If you determine that your dog is allergic to one of these things, it is best to prevent your dog from getting in contact with them again.

How to take care of a Dog Skin Allergy

In order to cure and prevent your dog’s allergies you should use anti-inflammatory and special products to clean your dog. To know exactly what are the causes of your dog’s skin allergy the vet can help you by doing a blood test or an intradermal skin test to recognize the objects and substances that are harmful to your dog. Usually, the best treatment is to prevent contact with new allergies, but when this is not an option medication can be given with the help of your vet. Some of these medications include but are not limited to ointments, antihistamines, and steroids.

 
 
 
 
 
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